In the Beginning,. . . and Now

At some point in their visit, most of our guests are curious about the beginnings of Three Rivers Lodge. Did we “discover” this Woods River? Was there ever another camp here? How did we ever find such a remote fishery?

So here’s a quick history.

Through the several friends I had made during my visits to Labrador as a traveling angler, I heard about this fertile river that was “too far from town to become a viable angling destination”. On this site, a father/son team – the Woolfreys – built a small camp in the early 90’s. The son was a pilot and had his own float plane making the transfer of materials and guests “affordable”. When the son lost his life in a road accident in 1994, the father lost interest in the project and a few years later, offered for sale the lease and the camp that sits upon it. We made an offer in early 1998.

The Woolfrey Camp When We First Arrived

The Woolfrey Camp When We First Arrived

In the springs of 1998 and 1999, we flew in 72 Otter-loads of materials and equipment and built the camps as they remain today.  The two buildings on the right of the pic below are the two original Woolfrey buildings, expanded and renovated.

Our Summer Home

Our Summer Home

Nineteen years have slipped past now since ‘the big push’ and the strengths (longest English word with only one vowel, by the way) that this endeavor was built upon have proven their worth and grounded the founders’ faith:  stewardship of the rivers, safety and comfort of our guests and staff, and a sporting, family atmosphere that consistently smooths any wrinkles that nature may toss our way.

Week after summer week we are treated to smiling guests who yarn on with their stories and find new ones here to spin for the rest of their days. No better stories were ever collected than in the first week of July this season. We had, as per normal, eight fine anglers in camp including a group of four ladies whose passion for fly angling inspired the camps.

Carroll's Speck

Carroll’s Speck

Carroll, Janine, Susan and Mary brought a level of joy that brightened the rainiest of days and lifted spirits for us all. Expert anglers, they devoured the challenges of the brookies’ toughest puzzles.

An Armful for Janine

An Armful for Janine

These old Woods River brookies can be moody at times, especially the big ones. Patience, a willingness to change flies, quiet observation, and relentless pursuit are the skills fine anglers bring with them. And, as payback, the brookies will hone those skills for the attentive angler.

Emile with a "net-long" slab

Emile with a “net-long” slab

It was our good fortune to have spent a week with the girls and with the other equally accomplished sports folks this summer. These stories, old and new, are the “gold” that we TRL’ers mine each summer. The glow that keeps this old dream thriving.

Enough Said

Enough Said

 

 

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2 Responses to In the Beginning,. . . and Now

  1. PETER SQUIRES says:

    WELL DONE ROBIN,YOU HAVE A FIRST CLASS CAMP AND I ALWAYS LOOK FORWARD TO RETURNING EACH TIME. WORDS CAN NOT DISCRIBE WHAT YOU HAVE THERE IN THE NORTH.YOU HAVE TO BE THERE TO EXPERIENCE IT FOR YOUR SELF. ONCE YOU HAVE DONE THAT ONE CAN’T WAIT TO RETURN AGAIN,AND AGAIN.
    CHEERS AND TIGHT LINES
    PETER SQUIRES

    • Robin Reeve says:

      Hi Peter, it’s folks like you, your dad and brothers who remind us daily how fortunate we are to spend our summers in this brutal wilderness fighting starvation and deprivation, swatting swarms of mosquitos and black flies, spending daylight to dark chest-deep in frigid waters, fending off white, brown and black bears, missing home and family, tossed by the harshest weather on the planet, fighting sadness and unfulfilled longings, and finding respite only in the few wee hours of darkness grasping for sleep on the unforgiving firmness of the Canadian Shield. You guys gotta come back SOON! SOME GOOD!!!

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